Monday, April 27, 2015

Spidey (In the 70s)

SPIDER-MAN/PETER PARKER. 2015. Watercolor on paper, 9 × 12″.

Here's a good scan of the commission I finished about a month ago. It's based on a Byrne drawing from the Roger Stern era of Spidey (which I have not read... yet). Such a stylish fellow.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Spider-Man, Con Recap

SPIDER-MAN. 2015. Ink & watercolor on paper, 11 × 17″.

I've been playing a good deal of catch-up lately, so I haven't been posting as much. Megacon and Big Wow went wonderfully — thank you to everyone who stopped by! The above Spidey pin-up was auctioned off at Big Wow, so it has a new home now. I heard that both shows will be changing owners next year, but I hope the experience remains much the same.

My only con for the rest of the year will be Sacramento in June. I'll post again when I open the commissions list.

Aside from new work, I'm currently reorganizing my studio. I hope to make a new video tour once I'm satisfied with the set-up (hopefully that will be sooner than never). Lastly, if you missed The Valiant over the last few months, a trade paperback will be available in a few weeks!

Monday, April 6, 2015

No More Mister Nice Guy

DAREDEVIL (after Miller). 2014. Ink & watercolor on paper, 9 × 12″.

Don't shoot your television! If you haven't heard Daredevil is almost here. Hope you guys are as excited as I am.

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Wacky Reference Wednesdays, No. 281

THE VALIANT #1 PAGES 16-17. 2014.
Ink(ed by Joe Rivera) on bristol board with digital color, 22 × 17″.

If you've followed my work over the past dozen years, you know how seriously I take composition and reference. Sound effects are as much a part of a successful image as lighting or anatomy — and I take them just as seriously. Aside from their patent use as visual representations of audible sensations, they have other benefits that are frequently ignored.


It's easy to tell when I'm concentrating.

I often joke that a good sound effect is one that covers up something that you don't want to draw. But the truth is, they can operate on many levels, providing guidance to the viewer as they navigate through a scene. Because effects read in a particular direction — even the more fanciful "words" — you can use them to counter the flow of what's going on behind them...


inks by my Pops, with digital holds and tone

... or in front. Sound effects are fantastic for playing with space — their abstract nature allows for far more experimentation with layering than with subject matter bounded by the laws of nature. Even comic book physics must obey certain rules to feel naturalistic.


cyan print of pencils

In this double-page spread, I've used the effects in 2 ways: first as a panel border, then as a motion trail of sorts. Having a physical object to interact with the figure was extremely helpful here, giving me the opportunity to manipulate the scene to get just the right angle.


digital layout

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